1835 LADYS MAGAZINE Belles Lettres FASHION Enlarged Edn HAND COLOURED PLATES VII

October 5, 2018 - Comment

YeOldBookWormsOnline Antiquarian Book Dealers Please See Other AuctionsWe List Daily And Offer Joint P&P on all our Books Please Message us for a quote to post to your Country THE LADIES MAGAZINE & MUSEUM OF THE BELLES LETTRES MUSIC FINE ARTS DRAMA FASHIONS &C IMPROVED SERIES ENLARGED VOL. VII (Followed by Le Follet) 1835 WITH

YeOldBookWormsOnline Antiquarian Book Dealers Please See Other AuctionsWe List Daily And Offer Joint P&P on all our Books Please Message us for a quote to post to your Country THE LADIES MAGAZINE & MUSEUM OF THE BELLES LETTRES MUSIC FINE ARTS DRAMA FASHIONS &C IMPROVED SERIES ENLARGED VOL. VII (Followed by Le Follet) 1835 WITH FIFTEEN HAND COLOURED ENGRAVED PLATES ILLUSTRATING WOMENS FASHION ENLARGED EDITION The Lady’s Magazine; or Entertaining Companion for the Fair Sex, Appropriated Solely to Their Use and Amusement, was an early British women’s magazine published monthly from 1770 until 1847. Priced at sixpence per copy, its publication began in August 1770 by the London bookseller John Coote and the publisher John Wheble. It featured articles on fiction, poetry, fashion, music, and social gossip. The magazine claimed a readership base of 16 000, a sum that has been considered a success when analysing the country’s contemporary literacy levels and underdeveloped printing technologies. The Lady’s Magazine dominated the market for most of its run, and led to imitations like the Lady’s Monthly Museum and the New Lady’s Magazine. Most who wrote for the publication were professional or semi-professional writers, and it could claim the author and dramatist Mary Russell Mitford among its contributors. The Lady’s Magazine featured many of the same stories that appeared in contemporary men’s magazines like The Gentleman’s Magazine, such as articles on poetry and the London stage; society news was another common topic. Unlike many men’s publications, however, the Lady’s Magazine largely stayed out of the political sphere and did not report on political events; for instance, in the lead-up to the French Revolutionary Wars, Lady’s Magazine readers are reassured that France is no match for British naval power, while readers of The Gentleman’s Magazine are warned that Europe is “at the present moment [in a state of] alarm and danger”. Mary Poovey, a professor of English, posits that The Lady’s Magazine’s projection of national strength was intended to avoid alarming its female readers and thus causing anxiety in the domestic sphere; conversely, men’s magazines sought to arouse anger over an emerging enemy and thus encourage male readers to be ready to undertake an active military role. While not classified as a fashion magazine, it did feature the subject in detail and was lavishly illustrated. In addition to fashion and dress, other featured subjects included fiction, music, and biographies. The scholar Margaret Beetham argues that by featuring these topics, Lady’s Magazine “came to define ‘the woman’s magazine’ for the next century”. The Lady’s Magazine, with its diverse range of subjects, helped normalise such magazines among upper-class readers. In the magazine’s first issue, it promised that in its content, “the housewife as well as the peeress shall meet with something suitable to their different walks of life”. The magazine is also notable as being the first to print extracts of upcoming books. The Lady’s Magazine sought to take a moral stance and display decorum in its writings. It printed a popular column on medical advice; frequently written by a male doctor, the column gave readers information on topics such as breast-feeding and menstrual pains. This Dr Cook also occasionally included mentions of sexuality, often with a sense of tawdry humour; one June 1775 article, for instance, spoke of fertility and hair colour, concluding that redheads have “the finest skins… and generally become the best breeders of the nation”. Ballister considers the mention of these subjects to be “progressive” for the era, and speculates that the magazine was able to print them due to the doctor’s “elderly eccentricity”, gender, and professional status. Author: —- Publisher: London Published by J. Page 112 Fetter Lane Edition: 1835 Vol VII Attributes: 15 Wonderful hand coloured fashion plates as called for. Full Leather binding. Condition: See photos as part of condition report: Original leather binding, front/Back boards hinge cracked, scuffs/rubbing to binding. pages tight, pages and plates clean, internally near fine, lacking x3 October plates. See photos for spines condition, missing small pieces of leather to the lower spine, leather starting to peel upper and middle sections. Information: 372pp + Index Etc.. 10″ x 6.4″ INTERNATIONAL BUYERS: PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TAX OR CUSTOM CHARGES. PLEASE BE AWARE THAT THIS IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY BEFORE BIDDING. Yeoldbookworms est 2013. We are (currently) an Ebay only Online Bookstore that deals with Antiquarian and Vintage Books. We list DAILY and source our books from only reputable sources. Please ask us about joint P&P UK or Worldwide. F.A.Q – We only accept paypal payments, please make payment 24 hours after purchasing. For joint P&P please send us a request. We are a registered company (Company House). Please message Fiona Gladwin for any questions or queries. PLEASE ASK US FOR A QUOTE REGARDING INTERNATIONAL POSTING TO YOUR COUNTRY. THANKYOU FOR LOOKING AND PLEASE SEE OTHER BUY IT NOW LISTINGS AND AUCTIONS.MORE PHOTOGRAPHS AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST